Category: San Francisco Industrial Real Estate News (9)

New Owner of high-profile Peninsula Tower aims to take biotech to new heights

Source: San Francisco Business Times
By: Ron Leuty
Date Posted: November 19, 2015

Emerging biotech companies are fighting a losing battle for space against deep-pocketed, aggressive tech companies. But Neil Fox expects to deliver a new life sciences option by this time next year.

Fox’s Phase 3 Properties Inc. closed Tuesday on its acquisition of the high-profile Centennial Towers project, nestled between San Bruno Mountain and Highway 101 in South San Francisco.

The developer plans to immediately convert part of the existing 12-story tower for biotech companies by the third quarter of 2016, then start construction of a 21-story, 400,000-square-foot biotech-centric structure to the immediate north that would come online in the second half of 2017.

centennial tower

The overall 800,000-square-foot development’s sale price wasn’t disclosed.

In a tight market for biotech labs/offices, Fox believes Phase 3’s focus on ready-to-occupy highrise space will be a winner. The vacancy rate for new biotech space in South San Francisco is in the low single digits, not counting a half-million square feet of sublease space held by Amgen Inc. (NASDAQ: AMGN).

If nothing else, Phase 3’s timing is impeccable: Space in the two-building, 253,000-square-foot first phase of HCP Inc.’s (NYSE: HCP) The Cove at Oyster Point already is booked for its third-quarter 2016 opening.

By the time, Phase 3’s 150,000-square-foot south tower upgrades for biotech will be ready, Fox said, and construction will be under way on the north tower.

Two other South San Francisco biotech projects entitled for roughly 3 million square feet — BioMed Realty Trust’s (NYSE: BMR) Gateway of Pacific and Shorenstein/SKS Properties’ bayside project — haven’t yet broken ground.

Centennial Towers developer Jack Myers earlier this year considered building the planned north tower as condominiums. But Fox, whose San Diego company focuses exclusively on life sciences, said the future is in biotech.

“Our research says there’s a need across the board. That’s why QB3’s incubators (in San Francisco and Berkeley) are so full,” Fox said. “There’s no real second-generation space on the market right now.”

Indeed, a number of young and emerging life sciences companies — as well as larger, growing companies — are in a critical search for space.

Buoyed by a renewed interest by venture capital firms in early-stage drugs, those companies are bringing on more staff to push experimental treatments into studies in humans, but they often lose the space race to larger, established tech or drug-development companies that can lease floors at a time.

“We need the space last month, not a year from now,” said Ken Horne, CEO of Symic Biomedical Inc., a 17-person, two-year-old company with one potential treatment in an early-stage clinical treatment and another set to start in the first half of next year. “A year is hard for a high-growth, high-momentum startup.”

Symic is housed in the University of California-related [email protected] life sciences incubator in San Francisco’s Dogpatch neighborhood.

But Fox’s excitement about Centennial Towers isn’t based on timing alone: The development will offer biotech companies a high-rise option they don’t otherwise have in the Bay Area, he said, as well as space that needs a minimum of work for a quick move-in.

The Cove from HCP and the Gateway of Pacific project from BioMed, which is being acquired by Blackstone Group, have played up their tech-like campuses and amenities such as a bocce ball court and walking trails. But Fox said Phase 3’s differentiator with Centennial Towers is the high rise option that rarely is offered biotech companies outside of high-cost, high-density markets such as New York and Boston.

Working with San Diego’s McFarlane Architects, Phase 3 has floor plans that Fox said work for 95 percent of biotech companies. The space is a mix of 60 percent office and 40 percent general biology and chemistry labs — all with natural light.

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP, the architect for Centennial Towers’ unique glass-facade south structure, also is designing the north tower.

“There’s no buried space in our buildings,” Fox said. “The quality of the project, the detail that went into it (by Myers), was something that was very attractive to us.”

Link to article: Peninsula Biotech

Robust CRE Space Absorption Bolstered Recent Price Gains

Source: CoStar
By: Mark Heschmeyer
Date Posted: October 14, 2015

While construction has been rising in many markets, aggregate demand across the major property types continues to outstrip supply, resulting in lower vacancy rates and rent growth. This, in turn, continues to drive strong investor interest in commercial real estate, according to the latest CoStar Commercial Repeat Sale Indices (CCRSI).

Pages from ccrsi-october2015

In August 2015, the two broadest measures of aggregate pricing for commercial properties within the CCRSI-the value-weighted U.S. Composite Index and the equal-weighted U.S. Composite Index-increased by 1.3% and 1%, respectively, and 12.6% and 11.4%, respectively, in the 12 months ended August 2015.

Click here for the full CCRSI October release and supporting materials: Commercial Repeat Sale Indices

Recent stronger growth in the General Commercial segment, which is influenced by smaller, lower-value properties, confirms a broad-based pricing recovery. Within the equal-weighted U.S. Composite Index, the General Commercial segment posted a monthly increase of 1% in August 2015 and 11.9% for the 12 months ended August 2015, propelling the index to within 7% of its pre-recession high.

Robust CRE Space Absorption Bodes Well for Continued Favorable Property Sales Conditions

For the four quarters ended as of the third quarter of 2015, net absorption across the three major property types-office, retail, and industrial-totaled 611.4 million square feet. That is 20% more than in the four quarters ended as of the third quarter of 2014. It is also the second-highest annualized absorption total on record since 2008.

The office and industrial sectors turned in particularly strong performances during this 12-month period, averaging net absorption of 0.3% and 0.4% of inventory, respectively. The the retail sector averaged a more modest 0.2% in the trailing four quarters ended as of the third quarter of 2015.

The CCRSI’s U.S. composite pair volume of $79.5 billion year-to-date through August 2015 was a 32% increase compared with the same period in 2014. This suggests that 2015 could be another record year for commercial real estate acquisitions.

Both the high and low end of the market are attracting increased capital flows, with volume up by nearly 32% in both the Investment-Grade and General Commercial segments.

Link to Article: CRE Property Price Growth Heats Up

San Francisco’s Vacancy Decreases for the 12th Consecutive Quarter to 3.1%
Source: CoStar

The San Francisco Industrial market ended the second quarter 2015 with a vacancy rate of 3.1%. The vacancy rate was down over the previous quarter, with net absorption totaling positive 307,426 square feet in the second quarter. Vacant sublease space decreased in the quarter, end- ing the quarter at 306,979 square feet. Rental rates ended the second quarter at $17.26, an increase over the previous quarter. There was 293,100 square feet still under construction at the end of the quarter.

San Francisco Industrial Real Estate

Absorption
Net absorption for the overall San Francisco Industrial market was positive 307,426 square feet in the second quarter
2015. That compares to positive 120,002 square feet in the first quarter 2015, positive 266,214 square feet in the fourth quarter
2014, and negative (22,710) square feet in the third quarter 2014.

The Flex building market recorded net absorption of posi- tive 178,179 square feet in the second quarter 2015, compared to positive 33,684 square feet in the first quarter 2015, positive 125,780 in the fourth quarter 2014, and positive 140,779 in the third quarter 2014.

The Warehouse building market recorded net absorp- tion of positive 129,247 square feet in the second quarter 2015 compared to positive 86,318 square feet in the first quarter 2015, positive 140,434 in the fourth quarter 2014, and negative (163,489) in the third quarter 2014.

Vacancy
The Industrial vacancy rate in the San Francisco market area decreased to 3.1% at the end of the second quarter 2015. The vacancy rate remained at 3.7% at the end of the first quarter 2015 compared to the previous quarter, and 4.0% at the end of the third quarter 2014.

Flex projects reported a vacancy rate of 4.4% at the end of the second quarter 2015, remained at 5.3% at the end of the first quarter 2015 compared to the previous quarter, and 5.8% at the end of the third quarter 2014.

Warehouse projects reported a vacancy rate of 2.7% at the end of the second quarter 2015, 3.2% at the end of first quarter 2015, 3.1% at the end of the fourth quarter 2014, and 3.3% at the end of the third quarter 2014.

Sublease Vacancy
The amount of vacant sublease space in the San Francisco market decreased to 306,979 square feet by the end of the second quarter 2015, from 333,754 square feet at the end of the first quarter 2015. There was 285,144 square feet vacant at the end of the fourth quarter 2014 and 290,380 square feet at the end of the third quarter 2014.

San Francisco’s Flex projects reported vacant sublease space of 164,850 square feet at the end of second quarter 2015, down from the 186,108 square feet reported at the end of the first quarter 2015. There were 208,699 square feet of sublease space vacant at the end of the fourth quarter 2014, and 91,366 square feet at the end of the third quarter 2014.

Warehouse projects reported decreased vacant sublease space from the first quarter 2015 to the second quarter 2015. Sublease vacancy went from 147,646 square feet to 142,129 square feet during that time. There was 76,445 square feet at the end of the fourth quarter 2014, and 199,014 square feet at the end of the third quarter 2014.

Rental Rates
The average quoted asking rental rate for available Industrial space was $17.26 per square foot per year at the end of the second quarter 2015 in the San Francisco market area. This represented a 5.4% increase in quoted rental rates from the end of the first quarter 2015, when rents were reported at $16.38 per square foot.

The average quoted rate within the Flex sector was $27.89 per square foot at the end of the second quarter 2015, while Warehouse rates stood at $13.03. At the end of the first quarter 2015, Flex rates were $26.53 per square foot, and Warehouse rates were $12.20.

Charles Schwab, Square latest companies to unload S.F. office space
Source: San Francisco Business Times
Reporter: Cory Weinberg
Date Posted: May 26, 2016

The amount of office space available for sublease in San Francisco is about to reach a five-year high now that mobile payments company Square and Charles Schwab are expected to lighten their footprints.

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A Charles Schwab (NYSE: SCHW) spokesman told the Business Times that it is looking to sublease its 327,000 square feet at 215 Fremont St. so it can eventually consolidate into one building at 211 Main St.

Square just put 50,000 square feet on the market from its 1455 Market St. space, Bloomberg reported. That would reduce Square’s leased space there by one-fifth and comes soon after neighboring tenant Rocket Fuel Inc. also put a big block of space on the market after revenue and hiring slowed.

As more companies ditch their office spaces, it raises alarms for a potential commercial real estate downturn, as I detailed last month. Those alarms may blare more loudly now that these potential listings put sublease space at about 1.7 million square feet, San Francisco’s highest total since the tail end of the recession in the last quarter of 2009.

With both real estate developers and tech companies relying on cheap capital, rising interest rates could dent those markets, Glenn Kelman, CEO of brokerage Redfin Corp. said on Bloomberg Television last week.

“There’s a bubble,” Kelman said. “There are prices that are too high on companies. There are prices that are too high on real estate. As interest rates go up, you’re going to see a contraction.”

But these two cases also highlight a paradox on the city’s real estate market – traditional companies that are fleeing the city to lower costs and technology companies looking to lap up as much space as they can afford in a tight real estate market.

Square is one of several tech companies (like Trulia, Zillow and Salesforce) that have looked to gobble up space way ahead of what they actually need in order to anticipate future growth in a space-constrained market. That’s also why the office vacancy rate is at a 15-year low, according to Cushman & Wakefield.

It’s also why 80 percent of the 4.1 million square feet of office space under construction in the Bay Area is pre-leased, as DTZ research director Garrick Brown detailed in a March blog post. He said there’s little reason to worry, even if the economy takes a dive in a couple years.

“So if current leasing trends persist, it is highly likely that none of this space will be delivered without a tenant connected to it. None! So is there about to be an oversupply of office space in San Francisco? It sure doesn’t look that way to me,” Brown wrote.

This is Charles Schwab’s second round of San Francisco consolidation in recent years, after it subleased its old headquarters at One Montgomery in 2009 to cut expenses. Last year, it announced intentions to move hundreds of jobs out of San Francisco to lower-cost places like Colorado and Texas.

“As the number of San Francisco employees has gradually declined, it has made it possible this year to consolidate some of our office space in the 215 Fremont building. Hence there is space available there for leasing,” Charles Schwab spokesman Greg Gable told the Business Times last week.

Real estate brokers said they haven’t seen the South Financial District space officially hit the market yet, so it’s unclear how it will be priced. Charles Schwab signed a deal there in 2001, renting at an ultra-low rate of $21 a square foot through 2024, according to CoStar.

Link to article: Office Bubble

San Francisco’s Vacancy Decreases to 3.6%
Net Absorption Positive 218,378 SF in the Quarter
Source: CoStar

The San Francisco Industrial market ended the first quar- ter 2015 with a vacancy rate of 3.6%. The vacancy rate was down over the previous quarter, with net absorption totaling positive 218,378 square feet in the first quarter. Vacant sublease space increased in the quarter, ending the quarter at 413,869 square feet. Rental rates ended the first quarter at $16.40, an increase over the previous quarter. A total of two buildings delivered to the market in the quarter totaling 108,080 square feet, with 252,593 square feet still under construction at the end of the quarter.

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Absorption

Net absorption for the overall San Francisco Industrial market was positive 218,378 square feet in the first quarter 2015. That compares to positive 265,569 square feet in the fourth quarter 2014, negative (20,730) square feet in the third quarter 2014, and positive 958,846 square feet in the second quarter 2014.

Tenants moving out of large blocks of space in 2015 included U-Save Equipment & Tool Rental moving out of (21,000) square feet at 1258 Bayshore Blvd.

Tenants moving into large blocks of space in 2015 include: Green Leaf moving into 105,600 square feet at 455 Valley Dr, Myokardia moving into 45,404 square feet at 333 Allerton Ave, and CloudFlare moving into 43,519 square feet at 101 Townsend St.

The Flex building market recorded net absorption of posi- tive 3,656 square feet in the first quarter 2015, compared to positive 129,751 square feet in the fourth quarter 2014, positive140,779 in the third quarter 2014, and positive 276,608 in the second quarter 2014.

The Warehouse building market recorded net absorp- tion of positive 214,722 square feet in the first quarter 2015 compared to positive 135,818 square feet in the fourth quarter 2014, negative (161,509) in the third quarter 2014, and positive 682,238 in the second quarter 2014.

Vacancy

The Industrial vacancy rate in the San Francisco market area decreased to 3.6% at the end of the first quarter 2015. The vacancy rate was 3.8% at the end of the fourth quarter 2014, 4.0% at the end of the third quarter 2014, and 4.1% at the end of the second quarter 2014.

Flex projects remained at a vacancy rate of 5.3% at the end of the first quarter 2015 compared to the previous quarter, 5.8% at the end of the third quarter 2014, and 6.4% at the end of the second quarter 2014.

Warehouse projects reported a vacancy rate of 3.1% at the end of the first quarter 2015, 3.3% at the end of fourth quarter 2014, 3.4% at the end of the third quarter 2014, and 3.3% at the end of the second quarter 2014.

Sublease Vacancy

The amount of vacant sublease space in the San Francisco market increased to 413,869 square feet by the end of the first quarter 2015, from 285,144 square feet at the end of the fourth quarter 2014. There was 290,380 square feet vacant at the end of the third quarter 2014 and 314,753 square feet at the end of the second quarter 2014.

San Francisco’s Flex projects reported vacant sublease space of 186,108 square feet at the end of first quarter 2015, down from the 208,699 square feet reported at the end of the fourth quarter 2014. There were 91,366 square feet of sublease space vacant at the end of the third quarter 2014, and 129,748 square feet at the end of the second quarter 2014.

Warehouse projects reported increased vacant sublease space from the fourth quarter 2014 to the first quarter 2015. Sublease vacancy went from 76,445 square feet to 227,761 square feet during that time. There was 199,014 square feet at the end of the third quarter 2014, and 185,005 square feet at the end of the second quarter 2014.

Rental Rates

The average quoted asking rental rate for available Industrial space was $16.40 per square foot per year at the end of the first quarter 2015 in the San Francisco market area. This represented a 4.1% increase in quoted rental rates from the end of the fourth quarter 2014, when rents were reported at $15.75 per square foot.

The average quoted rate within the Flex sector was $26.61 per square foot at the end of the first quarter 2015, while Warehouse rates stood at $12.23. At the end of the fourth quarter 2014, Flex rates were $25.23 per square foot, and Warehouse rates were $11.94.

Deliveries and Construction

During the first quarter 2015, two buildings totaling 108,080 square feet were completed in the San Francisco market area. This compares to 0 buildings completed in the previous three quarters.

There were 252,593 square feet of Industrial space under construction at the end of the first quarter 2015.

Some of the notable 2015 deliveries include: 901 Rankin St, an 82,480-square-foot facility that delivered in first quar- ter 2015 and is now 100% occupied by Goodeggs and Mollie Stone’s Markets, and 1 Kelly Ct, a 25,600-square-foot building that delivered in first quarter 2015 and is now 100% occupied by CS Bio Company, Inc.

The largest projects underway at the end of first quarter 2015 were The Cove – Building 3, a 132,034-square-foot building with 0% of its space pre-leased, and The Cove – Building 4, a 120,559-square-foot facility that is 0% pre-leased.

Inventory
Total Industrial inventory in the San Francisco market area amounted to 94,507,020 square feet in 4,841 buildings as of the end of the first quarter 2015. The Flex sector consisted of 23,955,743 square feet in 789 projects. The Warehouse sector consisted of 70,551,277 square feet in 4,052 buildings. Within the Industrial market there were 516 owner-occupied buildings accounting for 12,428,802 square feet of Industrial space.

Sales Activity

Tallying industrial building sales of 15,000 square feet or larger, San Francisco industrial sales figures fell during the fourth quarter 2014 in terms of dollar volume compared to the third quarter of 2014.

In the fourth quarter, nine industrial transactions closed with a total volume of $58,055,000. The nine buildings totaled 430,025 square feet and the average price per square foot equated to $135.00 per square foot. That compares to eight transactions totaling $80,684,000 in the third quarter. The total square footage was 349,762 for an average price per square foot of $230.68.

Total year-to-date industrial building sales activity in 2014 is up compared to the previous year. In the twelve months of 2014, the market saw 46 industrial sales transactions with a total volume of $410,518,100. The price per square foot has averaged $199.10 this year. In the twelve months of 2013, the market posted 31 transactions with a total volume of $191,567,100. The price per square foot averaged $176.40.

Cap rates have been higher in 2014, averaging 6.35%, compared to the twelve months of last year when they averaged 6.19%.

Link to Full Report: Costar Q1 Industrial Report 2015

Source: San Francisco Business Journal
Reporter: Annie Sciacca
Date: December 9, 2014

The Bay Area craft beer boom may be about to hit San Francisco’s Bayview.

The Board of Supervisors passed an amendment Tuesday to allow small beer manufacturing licenses along the Third Street corridor of the Bayview, after years of restricting alcohol sales in the area.

The move is part of the city’s push to support food and beverage manufacturers and comes as the Dogpatch neighborhood, just north of the Bayview, has become ground zero for the city’s craft brewing scene. The idea is also to create more jobs in the Bayview neighborhood, which has historically struggled with high unemployment and crime. However, the area is starting to see a wave of gentrification and has also been the site of rising home prices recently, with professionals moving in and buying up property.

The change in city law comes after 2003 legislation prohibited any new alcohol-related outlets on the corridor, citing an “unusually large” number of spots selling alcohol for both on-site and off-site consumption. That legislation attributed the high number of alcohol sellers to the “numerous peace, health, safety and general welfare problems in the area.”But legislators appear to be changing their tune. The Third Street Restricted Use District was amended to allow the sale of alcohol at grocery stores in 2007 and again in 2013 to allow wineries into the area. The amendment passed Tuesday will allow small beer manufacturing licenses for the production of up to 60,000 barrels of beer per year, tasting rooms and the sale of microbrewed beer.

With the passage of the amendment, Laughing Monk Brewing has plans to start brewing Belgian style beers at 1439 Egbert Avenue and to open an onsite tasting room with retail sales by the middle of 2015, according to planning documents. That brewery will join longtime Bayview brewery, Speakeasy Ales & Lagers.

Al Norman, president of the Bayview Merchants Association, said the amendment is drawing some resentment from merchants who have long requested but have been denied permits for selling alcohol.

But Barbara Gratta, a longtime Bayview resident and owner of Gratta Wines, said she sees the amendment as positive for the community.
Gratta will open up her first tasting room in Bayview in January in Butchertown Gourmet, which will consist of her Gratta Wines and Fox and Lion Breads.

“We’re a totally different kind of business than the existing alcohol sellers in the area,” Gratta said, pointing out that many of the existing sellers are corner liquor stores. “I think that’s one reason the (amendment to allow) wineries passed. What we’re intending to do is to promote a food and wine environment.”

Oakland has experienced a similar movement throughout the city to allow craft brewers to move in. For years, Oakland has put restrictions on the number of companies with liquor licenses in an attempt to limit a proliferation of corner liquor stores that tend to populate poor neighborhoods, said Margot Prado from Oakland’s Office of Economic and Workforce Development. But with the recent trend in local brewing, the city is not only lifting those restrictions, but encouraging breweries to open.

Prado said that Oakland recently passed an amendment to its zoning laws that allows breweries with manufacturing onsite to enjoy a shorter permitting process, and breweries are flourishing there because of it.

Link to article: Bayview Breweries

Calco Commercial represented the Landlord in an 11,395+/- SF office lease with the Munchery located at 375 Alabama Street. The creative office space was recently renovated and includes a full kitchen, HVAC, conference rooms, private offices & open areas, high ceilings, with superb natural light and a saw-tooth roof. Located in the Mission, 375 Alabama Street boasts excellent public transportation and is in close proximity to a myriad of local amenities, shops and restaurants.

Calco Commercial specializes in both Landlord and Tenant representation in the San Francisco and Peninsula markets. If have any questions about our available listings or about market conditions, call our office at 415.970.0000.

375 Alabama For Web

375 Alabama for Web2

kitchen_lightened_for web

3rd Quarter Market Update

Rental Rates & Vacancy

The 3rd Quarter of the entire San Francisco Industrial real estate market closed with a decreased vacancy rate of 6.4% (down from 6.7% in the 2nd Quarter 2013).  The specific warehouse sector for San Francisco ended the 3rd Quarter with a decreased vacancy rate of 5.1% (from 5.2% in Q2), and marks the 4th consecutive quarter in vacancy decreases. The Flex product type also saw a decrease in vacancy from 11.4% at the end of the 2nd Quarter to 10.4% at the end of the 3rd.     As to be expected with shrinking availability, the average industrial rental rates increased by 3% , ending the quarter at $13.84 per square foot annual (up from $13.44 psf., in the 2nd Quarter).  The average rate for warehouse real estate product was $10.38 psf. annual, an increase from the Q2 rates of $9.90 psf.  3rd Quarter Flex rates also increased from $22.36 (Q2) to $22.80 psf. annual.  

Inventory & Construction              

As of the end of the third quarter, the total inventory of industrial properties in the San Francisco market totaled 94,603,773 square feet in 4,805 buildings.  The flex market consisted of 24,486,495 square feet in 786 projects, and the warehouse market included 71,117,278 square feet in 4,019 buildings.  No new space was completed in the San Francisco commercial real estate marketplace in the 3rd Quarter of 2013.  Furthermore, the 3rd Quarter reported no new industrial constructions projects slated for San Francisco proper. 

Sales Activity (Second Quarter Activity)

Although year-to-date industrial real estate sales are down for the San Francisco industrial market, the 2nd Quarter saw sales figures increase in terms of dollar value with a total volume of $59,828,500.  The sales volume represents 8 buildings and an average price per square foot of $177.26.  2013 cap rates are recording lower than 2012, and are average 5.82% versus 6.98%, respectively. 

If you need help making sense of these numbers and what they mean for you as a Tenant, Owner or Investor in the San Francisco commercial real estate marketplace, call Calco Commercial at 415.970.0000.   

Source:  CoStar Group Real Estate Information www.costar.com

With the leasing of 41 Dorman to Komater Electric, Calco Commercial has leased nearly all of the 410,000+/- square foot multi-tenant complex.   Only the 13,252+/- single identity corner building located 2121 Oakdale Avenue remains available (2121 Oakdale).

The Valhalla Industrial Complex is the #1 Industrial Park ion San Francisco consisting of all concrete, open span, and functionally designed light industrial and office spaces.